Parents and Screen Time

Jun 28

Check out this article in this month’s Atlantic about screens and the effect they have on  parenting.

“. . . emerging research suggests that a key problem remains underappreciated. It involves kids’ development, but it’s probably not what you think. More than screen-obsessed young children, we should be concerned about tuned-out parents.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/07/the-dangers-of-distracted-parenting/561752/

Photo from Atlantic article

Want to Entertain the Kids in the Car Without Screens?

Apr 12

Summer is a time for family trips, often involving hours long car rides.  One way to avoid the road trip blues is to engage your kids.

 

Did you know that you can borrow audiobooks, and ebooks, from the local library? Nothing passes time like a good book read aloud. Just like at the library, you can search for titles, place holds, and request books be purchased.

Check out OverDrive or Libby to start borrowing audio and e books for free!

Traveling with Children

Mar 22

 

“Travel can be an enlightening and eye-opening experience for children of all ages: there’s new foods, experiences and sights, not to mention quality family time. But traveling with children can also be an overwhelming proposition — unpredictable schedules, long packing lists and cranky kids are just a few of the challenges you may encounter along the way. But here we’ll help you make traveling with kids a breeze. After all, you and your children should enjoy every moment seeing the world and create a lifetime of memories along the way. Isn’t that the point of travel in the first place?”

Read the New York Times article on travel with children:

https://www.nytimes.com/guides/travel/travel-with-kids?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=pay&smvar=guides

photo:https://catherinecooper.wordpress.com/2011/04/11/travelling-with-kids-products/

How to Raise an Emotionally Resilient Child

Feb 05

How to help build your child's emotional resiliency

“All children, even the most fortunate, suffer emotional injuries. At home, in school and on the playground, all children experience disappointment, frustration and failure; criticism and disapproval; and exclusion by peers. In every family, there will be moments of anger and misunderstanding.

In healthy development, children recover from these moments. Whether on their own or with our support, most children bounce back. Emotional injuries are, in many respects, analogous to physical injuries. Just as our cells must repair physical injuries, emotional injuries also must be healed. Without this healing, the injurious process will spread.”

http://www.pbs.org/parents/expert-tips-advice/2015/11/how-to-raise-an-emotionally-resilient-child/

Tips on Encouraging Kids to Eat Healthy

Jan 31

Sisters cooking

“When was the last time your child sat down at the dinner table and said, “Gee, thanks for this delicious plate of healthy food! Can I have seconds?” We can’t promise these tips will convert your picky eater into a fruit and vegetable fan, but they should make good food choices more attractive for everyone.”

 

http://www.pbs.org/parents/food-and-fitness/eat-smart/encourage-kids-to-eat-healthy-food/

13 Powerful Phrases Proven to Help an Anxious Child Calm Down

Nov 02

“If your child struggles with anxiety, you know the challenge of finding the right things to say when he or she is worried. It’s not easy to connect without making the fears worse, while at the same time offering support and encouragement.

Are you curious how you can help calm an anxious child?”

Source: 13 Powerful Phrases Proven to Help an Anxious Child Calm Down

‘Irresistible’ By Design: It’s No Accident You Can’t Stop Looking At The Screen

Mar 15

Technology is designed to be addictive, offering gratification that’s similar to that of drug abuse or gambling. Author Adam Alter says a new frontier could soon provide another escape from reality.

Source: ‘Irresistible’ By Design: It’s No Accident You Can’t Stop Looking At The Screen

Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students

Sep 12

“You might call it a silent epidemic.

Up to one in five kids living in the U.S. shows signs or symptoms of a mental health disorder in a given year.

So in a school classroom of 25 students, five of them may be struggling with the same issues many adults deal with: depression, anxiety, substance abuse.

And yet most children — nearly 80 percent — who need mental health services won’t get them.”

An estimated 20 percent of children show signs or symptoms of a mental health problem. It’s a destructive force in schools, but most educators don’t have the training or resources to help.

Source: Mental Health In Schools: A Hidden Crisis Affecting Millions Of Students