Tummy Time

Feb 15

Photo:https://www1.nichd.nih.gov/sts/about/Pages/tummytime.aspx

Parents are encouraged to “do tummy time” with their infants.  But what is it? How do you do it? Below you’ll find a link on one method for getting baby into, out of, and enjoying tummy time.  If you have questions, feel free to contact our office Lactation Consultant, Amity.  She has attended a TummyTime! method workshop and will happily walk you through the process.

http://www.tummytimemethod.com/tummytimetrade-method.html

https://www1.nichd.nih.gov/sts/about/Pages/tummytime.aspx

The Flu, a Guide for Parents

Feb 14

“Influenza (also known as flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. Flu is different from a cold, and usually comes on suddenly.”

The CDC offers several handouts online about how to reduce your risk of contracting the flu and what to do if you or a family member contracts the flu.  See below for more information:

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/family/flu-guide-for-parents-2017.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/immigrantrefugeehealth/pdf/seasonal-flu/advice_for_parents_english_508.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/updated/everyday-preventive-actions-8.5×11.pdf

How to Raise an Emotionally Resilient Child

Feb 05

How to help build your child's emotional resiliency

“All children, even the most fortunate, suffer emotional injuries. At home, in school and on the playground, all children experience disappointment, frustration and failure; criticism and disapproval; and exclusion by peers. In every family, there will be moments of anger and misunderstanding.

In healthy development, children recover from these moments. Whether on their own or with our support, most children bounce back. Emotional injuries are, in many respects, analogous to physical injuries. Just as our cells must repair physical injuries, emotional injuries also must be healed. Without this healing, the injurious process will spread.”

http://www.pbs.org/parents/expert-tips-advice/2015/11/how-to-raise-an-emotionally-resilient-child/

Head Lice Prevention 

Dec 07

            

It’s that time of year when head lice start to spread through schools.  Educate yourself so you can reduce your family’s likelihood of dealing with these unwelcome guests.

From the CDC:

Head lice are spread most commonly by direct head-to-head (hair-to-hair) contact. However, much less frequently they are spread by sharing clothing or belongings onto which lice have crawled or nits attached to shed hairs may have fallen. The risk of getting infested by a louse that has fallen onto a carpet or furniture is very small. Head lice survive less than 1–2 days if they fall off a person and cannot feed; nits cannot hatch and usually die within a week if they are not kept at the same temperature as that found close to the scalp.

The following are steps that can be taken to help prevent and control the spread of head lice:

  • Avoid head-to-head (hair-to-hair) contact during play and other activities at home, school, and elsewhere (sports activities, playground, slumber parties, camp).
  • Do not share clothing such as hats, scarves, coats, sports uniforms, hair ribbons, or barrettes.
  • Do not share combs, brushes, or towels. Disinfest combs and brushes used by an infested person by soaking them in hot water (at least 130°F) for 5–10 minutes.
  • Do not lie on beds, couches, pillows, carpets, or stuffed animals that have recently been in contact with an infested person.
  • Machine wash and dry clothing, bed linens, and other items that an infested person wore or used during the 2 days before treatment using the hot water (130°F) laundry cycle and the high heat drying cycle. Clothing and items that are not washable can be dry-cleaned OR sealed in a plastic bag and stored for 2 weeks.
  • Vacuum the floor and furniture, particularly where the infested person sat or lay. However, spending much time and money on housecleaning activities is not necessary to avoid reinfestation by lice or nits that may have fallen off the head or crawled onto furniture or clothing.
  • Do not use fumigant sprays or fogs; they are not necessary to control head lice and can be toxic if inhaled or absorbed through the skin.

To help control a head lice outbreak in a community, school, or camp, children can be taught to avoid activities that may spread head lice.

Further Reading from the Mayo clinic available here.

 

 

AAP wants tobacco and e-cigarettes regulated for people under 21

Oct 28

 “The developing brains of children and teens are particularly vulnerable to nicotine, which is why the growing popularity of e-cigarettes among adolescents is so alarming and dangerous to their long-term health,” Karen Wilson, who chairs the AAP’s Section on Tobacco Control, said in a statement.

Source: Pediatricians want tobacco, e-cigs banned for people under 21

How mothers can nurse themselves healthy

Oct 22

E. Bimla Schwarz, a women’s health expert and scholar of evidence-based data, sheds new light on the maternal health benefits of breastfeeding. “There is a simple and natural way to spare tens of thousands of women from having heart attacks each year… yet less than 8% of hospitals are fully promoting this approach.” — E. Bimla Schwarz

Source: How mothers can nurse themselves healthy